KIMBRA’S NEWEST VIDEO? A PLEA TO DITCH ANGORA WOOL FOR RABBITS’ SAKE

For Immediate Release:
27 September 2016

Singer Makes ‘Cameo’ Appearance in PETA PSA With Shocking Eyewitness Footage Showing Workers Rip Fur Out of Rabbits’ Skin While They Scream

Sydney – Kimbra has a message for her fans: ditch angora wool and shop cruelty-free. That’s what the ARIA award–winning singer says in her new print ad for PETA, which shows her posing with a rabbit beside the words “Angora Looks Best on Bunnies”. Kimbra also appears in a new PETA video with exposé footage from angora-wool farms, which reveals that rabbits scream and writhe in pain as workers violently rip out their fur – a process the animals endure every few months for two to five years until they are killed and skinned.

Kimbra says there are no penalties for animal abuse on rabbit farms in China – the source of 90 per cent of the angora sold around the world. “Please think twice before buying that sweater”, she says. “If the label says angora, remember these rabbits and leave the item on the rack.”

PETA – whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to wear” – notes that rabbits on angora-wool farms spend their lives confined to filthy, barren wire cages that harm their sensitive feet. They are denied bedding and the companionship of other rabbits, and workers tightly tether their legs before yanking their fur out. After this terrifying and painful ordeal, the rabbits often lie stunned and motionless.

“Angora production is barbaric”, says PETA Australia Campaign Coordinator Claire Fryer. “PETA and Kimbra are calling on everyone to ditch angora and stick to cruelty-free fabrics.”

Top Australian designers Wayne Cooper, Nicola Finetti, Alannah Hill, Aurelio Costarella and Collette Dinnigan have completely banned fur and angora wool from their lines.

Kimbra joins a growing list of celebrities – including The Veronicas, Ruby Rose, 360, Missy Higgins, Peter Siddle, Daniel Johns and Renee Somerfield – who have teamed up with PETA to speak out against cruelty to animals.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.au.