PETA CALLS ON GOVERNMENT OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA TO REJECT PROPOSED CORELLA CULL

For Immediate Release:
10 April 2019

Contact:
Emily Rice 0404 896 405; [email protected]

Animal Rights Group Points Out That Killing of Native Birds Would Be Cruel and Flawed

Goolwa – After hearing that Alexandrina Council has proposed culling corella flocks by gassing them, PETA has sent a letter to South Australia’s Minister for Environment and Water urging him not to approve such a measure.

“We must find ways to live withour fellow animals, including corellas,” writes PETA’s Emily Rice. “While you can’t stop progress, nor should you meet it with knee-jerk reactions and short-term fixes. Cruelty to animals simply has no place in a progressive society.”

Corellas – like many other animals – are being driven from their homes by drought, human population growth, and deforestation. Although the birds may currently be flocking more frequently, expert opinion is that their overall numbers haven’t actually increased.

Meanwhile, research has shown that culls are not effective in achieving long-term reductions in bird numbers among large flocks, as more individuals will move into the affected area to take the place of those who are killed. And lethal methods of species control are as inhumane as they are short-sighted – gassed birds spend their final moments in terror as they struggle first to escape and then just to breathe. Were the state government to approve the proposed cull, the council would find itself embroiled in an expensive, endless, and controversial killing cycle.

In the letter, PETA – whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to abuse in any way” – notes that corellas are intelligent cockatoos who mate for life. Their babies are completely dependent on both parents, who not only incubate the eggs together but also continue to raise their young as partners. If just one half of a breeding pair is gassed, their babies will likely starve.

A copy of the letter is available upon request. For more information, please visit PETA.org.au.

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